Thoughts from the Daf

Eiruvin 63a: May We Debate?

The teacher/student relationship is a most special one.  A teacher must treat his student as he would treat his own child, and a child must relate to his teacher as a parent. The Talmud even rules that one must return the lost object of one’s teacher before that of a parent, for “a parent brings you into this world, whereas a teacher brings you to the World to Come”1 (Bava Metzia, 33a).

Eiruvin 60b: He's Only a Prophet

To tell someone that his words are those of prophecy would seem to be the highest compliment one can give. The prerequisites for being a prophet are tough indeed, and those who can meet them are certainly most worthy of praise (see Maimonides, Laws of Foundations of Torah 7:1). Our great prophets help inspire, teach, comfort, and lead the people. Their uplifting words laid the vision for the Jewish nation, and even those who rejected the halachic system of Judaism embraced much of the prophetic vision.

Eiruvin 46b: Ignoring the Rules

While the basis of Jewish law (and much more) is to be found in the Talmud, the Talmud, in and of itself, is not a very good text for determining Jewish law. The legal analysis, the range of views, the tendency to move from one topic to another, and the fact that any given topic may be discussed in a variety of places makes reaching a conclusion on any particular issue a difficult task.

Eiruvin 41b: Going Out of Your Mind

Poverty is a terrible curse, one that has been the unfortunate lot of many Jews over the years. While we are blessed to live in the wealthiest generation in all of Jewish history, having enough money is a concern of many Jews around the world. Whether this is due to the almost unbearable burden of day school tuition, to the lack of skills for gainful employment, or to a host of other factors, for many, it is the prayer for sustenance with which it is easiest to identify.

Eiruvin 36b: My Teacher, My Friend

The Daf Yomi thought is dedicated by the family of Dr. Solomon Burack, ob"m in observance of his Yahrzeit.  May his memory be for a blessing.

 

It is well accepted that enacting laws retroactively is most unfair, potentially throwing into chaos that which was done under past laws. However, an action we take today often sheds light on something we did yesterday.

Eiruvin 31a: Home Sweet Home

Both an eiruv techumim, which allows one to walk an additional 2,000 cubits (approximately 1 kilometre) outside of the city limits, and an eiruv chatzerot, which allows us to carry on Shabbat, require the placement of food in a designated spot. The food must be edible, a requirement that would exclude tevel[1], food from which tithes (terumah and ma'aser) were not taken.

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