Isaac

Toldot: All My Children

It is hard to imagine a more disparate couple than Yitzchak and Rivka, the quiet contemplative husband who would "meditate in the fields" (24:63), and the worldly, independent-thinking wife who “ran again to the well” (Breisheet 20:24). Yitzchak spent his entire life in the land of Israel, never traveling the world. He was, as our Sages describe him, "a pure offering", ready to sacrifice himself to G-d. He could see no evil in others, and thus could be easily fooled by both Eisav and Yaakov.

VaYera: Family Ties

“Take your son, your only son, the one you love, v'lech lecha, and go for yourself to the land of Moriah” (22:2). So begins the command of G-d demanding the sacrifice of Yitzchak. After waiting so long to have a child with Sarah, Abraham was commanded to take his child and return him to G-d. In the face of such a command Abraham was silent—or shall we say speechless?—unable to comprehend the Divine will even as he arose early to carry it out.

Toldot: And He Grew Up

"Vayigdal Haish, and the man grew up and grew more and more, until he became very big" (Breisheet 26:13). At first glance, this is a very strange verse. The Torah has just described Yitzchak's and Rivka's move to Gerrar (Yitzchak's place of birth[1]) and the great wealth he acquired there. This move occurred after Eisav's sale of the birthright to Yaakov--an event that happened many years after the Torah, using the same terminology, tells us "vayigdelu hane'arim, and the young men grew up" (25:27).

Toldot: Blind Love

How sad when parents do not understand their children, and are unaware of what they’re up to. Either through purposeful ignorance or just plain being clueless, it is not uncommon for parents to be unaware that their children are drinking, on drugs, or engaged in illicit sexual activity. Even great parenting and great efforts cannot ensure that we are fully aware of our children’s whereabouts at all times.

VaYetze: Why Leave Home?

It is quite evident that Yitzchak and Rivka had differences of opinion regarding the difficult task of raising their twin boys. Their contradictory assessments of Eisav and Yaakov continued to the end of their days. Rivka sensed that Eisav would not, could not, be rehabilitated from his nefarious ways, whereas Yitzchak never gave up hope that Eisav would ultimately remain a Jew.

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