Holiday Thoughts

The Day After

October 10, 2019 By: Rabbi Jay Kelman
“It was on the next day…” (Shemot 18:13). Apparently, something of significance had happened on the previous day, yet the Torah makes no mention of it. The day, that special day that needs no mention, can be none other than Yom Kippur (Rashi). And what was it that happened on the day after that first Yom Kippur? “Moshe sat to judge the people, and the people stood by Moshe from the morning until the evening”. Inspired by their repaired and...
Continue Reading »

Yom Kippur: A Great Day!

October 07, 2019 By: Rabbi Jay Kelman
Our society worships greatness. Whether it be athletes, rock stars, actors or successful business leaders, they are showered with wealth and adulation and pampered wherever they go. People pay great sums of money to be in the presence of, or acquire an object once used by, the perceived greats of our society.  Attaching oneself to greatness is indeed a most noble and worthy endeavour. It is why Biblical exegesis has interpreted the verse...
Continue Reading »

Aseret Yemi Teshuva: I Confess

October 06, 2019 By: Rabbi Jay Kelman
Integral to the teshuva process is the act of vidui, confession. One can intellectually know one has done something wrong; one can even feel terrible about it. But unless and until one verbalizes that one has sinned—and for sins against our fellow man, vidui should be done publicly (Hilchot Teshuva, 2:5)—teshuva cannot be complete. It is precisely because it is so hard to admit a wrong,...
Continue Reading »

Rosh Hashanah: Early, Late or Just Right

September 28, 2019 By: Rabbi Jay Kelman
"And on the seventh month on the first day of the month, it shall be a day of rest. It is a sacred day for remembrance and blowing" (Vayikra 23:24). What the Torah calls a day of blowing (of the ram's horn) is more commonly known as Rosh Hashanah, the New Year. Yet the seventh month seems an odd time to be celebrating the start of a new year. We are apparently six months late…or perhaps it is six months early...
Continue Reading »

Tu BAv: Coming Together

August 16, 2019 By: Rabbi Jay Kelman
One of the lessons Nehama Leibowitz, z”l, drilled into us during the time I was fortunate to study with her was that if Rashi has two explanations for a pasuk, it means he was not fully satisfied with either. Had he been, he would have given only that one explanation. If such is true regarding just two explanations, what can we say about something that has six explanations?  “Rabban Shimon ben Gamliel said:...
Continue Reading »

Pages